GODSPIT INTERVIEW WITH GUITARIST LUVLEGGS



First off, hello. How did Godspit form and could you provide a brief history of the band?


I've been trying to find like minded people who understand the differences of what has made Motorhead so cool for all these years.  Brian came to a few Go Like Hell shows and we started talking, then when I was writing material for the last Pleasure Elite CD I had a track that instantly reminded me of him, he was on board with the idea and started performing more with us.  We were talking after I got back from Africa and the idea of working on tunes in this vein came up so I started writing music and passing them to him.  Once we had enough tunes to choose from I started whittling the list down to the ones that I felt best represented the feel I wanted to represent.  The hard part has been getting a full band together.  We just added Joe who played with me in Go Like Hell and then played in Himsa before they broke up and we've added Nils Scurvy on bass.  Game plan is to get everyone tight and then hit the studio in late Dec/ Early Jan to record the full length.


The artwork for your self-titled EP “Godspit” by Nev, conjures up a supremely old-school vibe that is powerful and undeniable. I mean this kind of in-your-face, striking and bold yet simplistic style illustrates what Godspit is all about, right? Most will probably think fast, unrelenting and without frills. So, what can one expect to unleash when playing your four-song EP?

The EP is definitely that, straight forward in your face Motorheadish fast and to the point, Nev did an amazing job of nailing the feel, not many artists can conjure up a feeling or vibe like he did and I'm looking forward to his art for the full length. 

How did you become interested in this type of music? What other genres do you love and how did they attract you to them? How do you think your life would be different if this music what not a part of it? Depressed, dead, ignorant or better?

I grew up with my dad listening to sabbath and zeppelin and mom listening to old country, when I got into high school I thought it would be all new music and sadly everyone was still listening to the same stuff I'd been hearing for years.  I ended up getting into punk because it was new and dangerous, a few years later Venom and Metallica and Slayer started putting stuff out and they kept coming back to how they were influenced by Motorhead and after hearing them once it was like a light switched on and I realized that they were the one band doing it for all the right reasons.

Later I got into Skinny Puppy and Ministry for a bit, I liked how they took whatever sounds they could find and made the stuff they were doing sound more original, then in the 90's I really got into bands like the Jesus Lizard and Cop Shoot Cop and their disjointed rhythms.

These days I listen to most anything as I am always trying to find something new and innovative, but when it comes to writing I've really been trying to nail the nuances of the different feels Motorhead has employed over the years, I love how they can do Capricorn or Iron Fist and they still sound like they are the same band

As far as how it's influenced me and who I've become...music has been the one constant in my life for so long it's like an extra limb, I wouldn't know what to do without it.

You decided to give out copies of the EP to the first 50 people to email you with their address. How has that gone so far? Have you sent them all off, or are you seeing that even with the word “free” people are too fat and lazy to contact you or perhaps, the band is too underground to get more than 50 individuals to even notice the give-away?

I think we have a few left to giveaway.  The response has been great, I have always liked it when a band cares enough to be in contact with their fans.  I remember VoiVod doing almost the same thing right after they put out their first album and it was so cool to get something from them.  So I kind of wanted to start things off in that manner.  Let the people know that I appreciate them taking the time to listen to us and at the same time know that as fans ourselves this is what we would dig.  I believe that the best way to build a following is by getting to the people.  You do things the right way.  Write songs you believe in, give them a concise idea of what they're going to get and treat the fans with the same appreciation they treat you.  I love finding a band before anyone else does so hopefully this will get people into the band and they'll tell their friends.

How do you fit into the Seattle music scene?

I've gone from misfit outcast to sold out shows to nobody and back to sold out shows, I have never really tried to fit what I do into a scene, sometimes what I'm doing works within a scene and sometimes a scene will form around what I've been doing, this band feel more like a band that is destined to not really be a Seattle band but a band that does better outside of the Seattle area it just feels more European to me, maybe that is the Motorhead / Old School Thrash in me but imagine us doing better across the water. 

Godspit’s attitude appears to just be about playing good music in a non-modern vein, but is there some type of message/ideology within? What do you think of bands that string along a big political agenda with their music? 

Definitely the attitude we're going for...I think we are in a spot that is good for us,  Brian and I have played in bands that influenced bands years later and I think coming back to an era of music when it was about writing good songs and letting it all hang out on stage is perfect for us.  Hopefully people will get it. 

There are some great bands with political agendas and messages, I think that we need those types of bands as badly as we need any type of music.  It just doesn't happen to be our goal.

What are the lyrics generally about? Drinkin’, whorin’, partyin’? Are they consistent with your own life and thoughts or is it simply all about going along with the image of Godspit?

No general idea song wise, I tend to come up with the name while I'm working on the music (old habit) I'll just be like this reminds me of Snitches and then I'll either come up with a chorus and pass it on to Brian to do the verses or I'll just give him the name of the song and the idea I had.  

On your Myspace page, it says “Motorhead, a band that epitomized everything rock n' roll and had influenced everyone including god (yeah I know trick question...Lemmy is god). Thus we have made ourselves unto his likeness.” So would you say you are somewhat of a tribute band or is Motorhead just a huge, huge influence?

More of a huge huge influence.  I don't think anyone could ever be Motorhead but hopefully people will see the part of Motorhead in us that says, play it loud, write it well, have a laugh and don't forget the jack.

Since the band is steeped in old-school spirit, what do you think “old-school” really means when it comes to music? There are tons of bands heralding the retro greats, the golden heroes, but they might not fully understand what those bands were about. Since most if not all Godspit members were a part of the more extreme side of the music scene in the 80’s, 90’s, it’s assumed that you do know what this “old-school spirit” is. So, what is it exactly and how does it manifest itself through Godspit’s sound?

Old School to me is more of an attitude, for me it was tape trading and finding that band before anyone else had heard them, It was bands that embraced metal and punk and tried to make them fit together, it was about a lot of kids getting to have something that was theirs and then it outgrew itself.  I personally never expected or wanted to see Slayer in front of more than 500 kids that knew every word and I still don't, I think once you get to a point you're playing in front of more than 1000 people you've kind of lost the intimacy and you've become more of an event than a band.  But most importantly I think of Old School as bands that would play the music they love even if there were no big paychecks because that is how it all started.

Has where you are with music changed since you first started playing in bands? As in, has your outlook on why you play music and the feel of where you are in the music scene transformed since the beginning of your trek into it?

Oh I definitely have gone through changes, you set goals and when you get to that goal to set another at some point you end up where you never intended.  I got over that quickly when I realized that it was the music that drives me not the money.

For some people that may be great but my opinion has always come back to that Lemmy has done it right.  He can make a living at what he loves and he can record whenever he likes and he plays to the size of crowds that I like seeing shows in.  To me that is success.

Please state what you think of the following things:

The current heavy metal/rock n’ roll scene

I like some of the stuff that is coming out, I think it had a nice burst for a few years and that brought a few too many copy cat bands out but that is kind of expected.  I tend to look for bands that stand out these days so if I find a couple cool bands a month I'm happy.

Mormons

As with most religious sects I find them hypocritical as a whole and realize that some people need something to grasp onto to give them guidance so if it makes them treat others better good for them.  I am happy with who I am so I abstain from religions in general.

Soundgarden

The actual soundgarden on Sand Point is pretty cool when it's windy out, the band put out a handful of good songs, Chris Cornell is a douchebag and Kim is the most down to earth guys you'll ever meet.

Groupies

There are good and bad, the fanatics are hard because they spend so much time decoding your every move you sometimes feel they know more about you than you do about yourself.  I'm pretty sure I have never complained about a gorgeous girl after a show, if I do I can guarantee I should be put down like a horse with a bad leg.  

Amphallang

I've kind of gotten over my piercing fixation but it was fun while it lasted.

What does the future hold for Godspit? Thanks for the interview! Is there anything else you’d like to leave with Tanin’iver Zine?

Future?  Game plan for the next year is to finish up the first full legth and get that out.  Get a video out and start spreading the word and then Hit the road hopefully in late fall next year.  That and keep writing as much as we can